GTA V- Yoga Mini Game

Picked up a copy of GTA V earlier this week. 5/5 stars btw, just a fantastic game. What put it over the top besides the boring golf and tennis mini-games was the funny yoga missions. As a recently certified 200-hr yoga teacher, (who currently teaches Tuesdays at Free Spirit Yoga), this tickled deep in my Psoas.

Coffee Cup Quiche : Lifestyles

Coffee Cup Quiche : Lifestyles.

Microwave Mug Quiche

Quiche in a Microwave

3/5 Stars, but not terrible.

I had it with onion and chive cream cheese

A Quarter of a mini-bagel

Shredded Gouda

Milk

Salt and Pepper.

I’m going to play around with this recipe

Since it is tough to cook for 1

In a studio apartment

Alone with a microwave

ps. dont get me wrong

I do cook

but I’m curious

and unattended

Freezing, with Clay Buchholz | FanGraphs Baseball

Below is an excerpt of great article written by Jeff Sullivan about my guy lucky 11. It was just a few years ago that Clay was among the lead leaders in ERA in 2010 going 17-7 with a 2.33 ERA across 177 innings.

3 Years later he has a 1.51 ERA with 90 Ks in 95 innings. I can not wait to see what he is capable of over a healthy 200 inning season. I know that this year’s team maybe one of the best the Sox have been in a generation, but how much better could it have been with out #11’s 3 month sabbatical.

Against righties, Buchholz has gotten his called strikeouts over the outer half, or near the outer edge. Against lefties, he’s alternated inner and outer edges. Know that the strike-zone boxes are included just as reference points, and they’re hastily-produced approximations.

All of his called strikeouts against lefties have come on fastballs, sinkers, or cutters — or, some variation of heat. Most of the inside ones have been sinkers tailing back over the inner edge. Most of the outside ones have been cut, with Buchholz targeting the back door. A sample, featuring James Loney:

Clay v. Lefty

His three most inside called strikeouts against righties have come on curves. For much of the rest, we find those back-door sinkers, with Buchholz taking full advantage of his horizontal movement. A sample, featuring Jayson Nix:

Clay v Righty

If you take a look at Z-Swing%, Buchholz, rather unsurprisingly, is in the group with the lowest rates. Batters have taken a lot of strikes, and not just in two-strike counts. More interestingly, from last year, Buchholz’s O-Swing% is unchanged. His Z-Swing% is down from 63% to 57%. So batters have swung less often, but only at pitches in the zone, which is an encouraging thing to see for a pitcher. Something else that most certainly helps: Buchholz has been given a more friendly zone this season. One in eight pitches out of the zone have been called strikes, against a league average of one in 14. Implied is that Buchholz has pitched to good receivers, and implied also is that Buchholz has done well pitching to spots right near edges. That’s where called strikes are found, and that’s where called strikeouts are found.

Looking back, Buchholz has generated a remarkable amount of called strikeouts. The big question, then, is what to make of this for the future.

Lets just remember what this kid did in his 2nd career major league start in 2007: Just a nasty curveball for a called strike 3. NO HITTER!

2007 Clay Buchholz Curve

2007 Clay Buchholz Curve

Love looking at fangraphs.com Thank you for the daily insight!

via Freezing, with Clay Buchholz | FanGraphs Baseball.

11:11

Image

Bring out the brooms, the Red Sox just swept the Yankees in their last 3-game series at Fenway Park. Before the game, they honored Mariano Rivera, who unless they make the postseason, made his last visit to Fenway as an active player. But this really isn’t a case of the Mo the Merrier, lol, usually you try to avoid seeing the other teams closer, even if he has choked recently. The bigger picture here is that the Red Sox are running away with the division, a year after finishing in Last Place in the formidable AL East.

With another loss by the Rays and Rangers today, the Yanks are still in contention of both wild card spots. Who would the sox rather face in the first round of the ALDS is quite another story. We all seem to conclude that it will be a Red Sox v Tigers ALCS, but that’s counting your chickens before they hatch, all we can submit is that this is a farm-raised organic team… Literally.

Look at all the homegrown players that are apart of this years success: Lester, Buchholz, Pedroia, Middlebrooks, Bogaerts. Ellsbury and Bradley Jf. This is a solid core, part of the winning mold that Clay demonstrated today going by going 11-0 for the first time since Clemens. Lucky 11. It is a shame that he had to spend 3 months dealing with a sore neck from ‘sleeping with his baby weirdly?’ but if we are going to make it to the ALCS and match up with likely CY young apparent Max Scherzer, we need every ounce of our lucky 11 to go toe to toe with the Tremendous Tigers. Even though he was not at his best today, walking 4 and only striking out 3, besides an unearned run in the top of the 1st from what is usually a good pick-off move, he only permitted 2 hits to a rejuvenated yankee lineup, so kudos for that.

The next speculation we could have is how would you structure the playoff rotation.

In the ALDS, a best of 5 series, in a four man rotation, who do you want to pitch twice?

Clay, Lester, Lackey or Peavy. I’d say Lester, your opening day starter, who has been your workhorse all season and is finally turning the corner by using his cutter more selectively. Lester, Clay, Lackey and Peavy… no need for a game 5.. and hopefully no need for a game 4 because the Sox have seen the most pitches in baseball, a thousand more than the next patient team. We’re full of grinders and gamers and a lot of luck.